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FAQ

How can someone in Japan marry a Japanese women?
I am assuming that you are a foreigner.Yes, a foreign man living legally in Japan can get married to a Japanese woman. You must get from your embassy or consulate affidavits certifying that you are legally free to marry. The affidavit is sometimes referred to as a Certificate of Eligibility to Marry (konin yoken gubi shomeisho, 婚姻要件具備証明書). Some embassies have versions in Japanese and some do not. You may need to get a certified translation of the document.The next thing that is necessary is a copy of both people’s Registry of Current Residence (jūminhyō: 住民票). This can be gotten, for a few hundred yen, at the municipal office where the person is registered.The next step is to fill out the Application / Notification of Marriage (konin-todoke, 婚姻届). You can get this at the same municipal office at which you get the Registry of Residence. You can fill out the form on the spot or take it home and do so at your leisure.With the filled out Marriage Application, the Registry of Residence, and the Certificate of Eligibility you are almost ready to do the deed. Go to the local municipal office and give the above papers to the person at the Citizen Affairs Office (shimin ka, 市民課). You will also need to hand over your Residence Card (Zairyu Card, 在留カード). You should also bring along your personal seal and, just to be on the safe side, your passports. A few minutes after handing all this over, the civil servant will come back and tell you that they are finished with the paperwork and you are now [legally] married. The entire process is without charge.Should you want some sort of paper saying that you are married you can ask for a certificate or declaration of marriage (Konin Todoke Juri Shomei-sho, 婚姻届受理証明書). This may cost a few hundred yen. I believe that some cities have started giving out, for a nominal fee, a fancier looking marriage certificate. This was not an option when and where I got married.Now the question remains as to whether the marriage in Japan is legally binding in your home country. This will depend on the treaties between the countries involved. This question is best answered by your embassy.Can you do the marriage thing in a city you do not live in? Perhaps, but you will need to get all the paperwork in order before you go to their municipal offices. You will probably have to fill out that city’s Application for Marriage.Good luck. Live Long and Prosper.
How do people get married in Japan? Is it true that they just simply sign some documents to be legally married?
Short answer- Yup, pay a few hundred yen, sign the papers, and you're married.Longer answer - The following starts from the position a foreigner getting married to a Japanese national. The marriage process is the same for two Japanese nationals, minus all the stuff about embassies and passports.A foreigner living legally in Japan can get married to a Japanese national. You must get from your embassy or consulate affidavits certifying that you are legally free to marry. The affidavit is sometimes referred to as a Certificate of Eligibility to Marry (konin yoken gubi shomeisho, 婚姻要件具備証明書). Some embassies have versions in Japanese and some do not. You may need to get a certified translation of the document.The next thing that is necessary is a copy of both people’s Registry of Current Residence (jūminhyō: 住民票). The Japanese national needs to get a copy of their Family Register (kosekitouhon 戸籍謄本). Both can be gotten, for a few hundred yen, at the municipal office where the persons is registered.The next step is to fill out the Application / Notification of Marriage (konin-todoke, 婚姻届). You can get this at the same municipal office at which you get the Registry of Residence. You can fill out the form on the spot or take it home and do so at your leisure.With the filled out Marriage Application, the Registry of Residence, and the Certificate of Eligibility you are almost ready to do the deed. Go to the local municipal office and give the above papers to the person at the Citizen Affairs Office (shimin ka, 市民課). You will also need to hand over your Residence Card (Zairyu Card, 在留カード). You should also bring along your personal seal and, just to be on the safe side, your passports. A few minutes after handing all this over, the civil servant will come back and tell you that they are finished with the paperwork and you are now [legally] married. The entire process is without charge.Should you want some sort of paper saying that you are married you can ask for a certificate or declaration of marriage (Konin Todoke Juri Shomei-sho, 婚姻届受理証明書). This may cost a few hundred yen. I believe that some cities have started giving out, for a nominal fee, a fancier looking marriage certificate. This was not an option when and where I got married.Now the question remains as to whether the marriage in Japan is legally binding in your home country. This will depend on the treaties between the countries involved. This question is best answered by your embassy.Can you do the marriage thing in a city you do not live in? Perhaps, but you will need to get all the paperwork in order before you go to their municipal offices. You will probably have to fill out that city’s Application for Marriage.
How can two foreigners get married in Japan?
Yes, two foreigners living legally in Japan can get married. Both people must get from their embassy or consulate affidavits certifying that the person in question is legally free to marry. The affidavit is sometimes referred to as a Certificate of Eligibility to Marry (konin yoken gubi shomeisho, 婚姻要件具備証明書). Some embassies have versions in Japanese and some do not. You may need to get a certified translation of the document.The next thing that is necessary is a copy of both people’s Registry of Current Residence (jūminhyō: 住民票). This can be gotten, for a few hundred yen, at the municipal office where the person is registered.The next step is to fill out the Application / Notification of Marriage (konin-todoke, 婚姻届). You can get this at the same municipal office at which you get the Registry of Residence. You can fill out the form on the spot or take it home and do so at your leisure.With the filled out Marriage Application, the Registry of Residence, and the Certificate of Eligibility you are almost ready to do the deed. Go to the local municipal office and give the above papers to the person at the Citizen Affairs Office (shimin ka, 市民課). You will also need to hand over your Residence Card (Zairyu Card, 在留カード). You should also bring along your personal seal and, just to be on the safe side, your passports. A few minutes after handing all this over, the civil servant will come back and tell you that they are finished with the paperwork and you are now [legally] married. The entire process is without charge.Should you want some sort of paper saying that you are married you can ask for a certificate or declaration of marriage (Konin Todoke Juri Shomei-sho, 婚姻届受理証明書). This may cost a few hundred yen. I believe that some cities have started giving out, for a nominal fee, a fancier looking marriage certificate. This was not an option when and where I got married.Now the question remains as to whether the marriage in Japan is legally binding in your home countries. This will depend on the treaties between the countries involved. This question is best answered by the couple’s respective embassies.Can you do the marriage thing in a city you do not live in? Perhaps, but you will need to get all the paperwork in order before you go to their municipal offices. You will probably have to fill out that city’s Application for Marriage. Years ago, I had two friends from New Zealand who got married in Sendai. At the time, neither of them lived in Sendai, but they had all the paperwork necessary. I don’t know if this is still possible.Good luck. Live Long and Prosper.
How do I determine the value of international shipments?
I'm assuming you are referring to CBP Form 3299- Declaration For Free Entry of unaccompanied Articles.Virtually everything you ship that has to do with setting up your household will be entitled to enter free of duty, so don't fret too much about values. Just estimate the best you can. Certainly a used book or DVDs might only be worth $1 each, or even less.If you ship a large amount of alcoholic beverages or tobacco products, you may have to pay some duty.It will be easier if you do not ship any agricultural products or food.And of course, do not ship any firearms, ammunition or contraband.CBP has very thorough instructions on how to fill out the form on-line. Just google CBP 3299.Hope this helps, and good luck with your move.
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