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How do I fill out an NCC Scholarship form?
NCC (National Cadet Corps) is a voluntary organization which recruits cadets from high schools, colleges and universities all over India.To enroll yourself to it, Contact to your college/school office, they will give you forms and other necessary information about NCC. Every school/college have a person dedicated to NCC, He/She will guide you further.For NCC, your school/college should fulfill the requisite pre-conditions are as follows :(a) Availability of students for enrollment.(b) Availability of eligible teachers to be appointed as Associate NCC Officer(ANO). One ANO per school/college for Junior Division or Senior Division cadets.(c) Availability of parade ground, storeroom for NCC.(d) Short Range for firing in the vicinity.(e) Supplementing financial resources (in case of Govt aided institutions). Private institutions are required to bear entire expenditure of the State’s share. Details will be available with nearest NCC Bn HQ.
How does one get invited to the Quora Partner Program? What criteria do they use, or is it completely random?
I live in Germany. I got an invite to the Quora partner program the day I landed in USA for a business trip. So from what I understand, irrespective of the number of views on your answers, there is some additional eligibility criteria for you to even get an email invite.If you read the terms of service, point 1 states:Eligibility. You must be located in the United States to participate in this Program. If you are a Quora employee, you are eligible to participate and earn up to a maximum of $200 USD a month. You also agree to be bound by the Platform Terms (https://www.quora.com/about/tos) as a condition of participation.Again, if you check the FAQ section:How can other people I know .participate?The program is invite-only at this time, but we intend to open it up to more people as time goes on.So my guess is that Quora is currently targeting people based out of USA, who are active on Quora, may or may not be answering questions frequently ( I have not answered questions frequently in the past year or so) and have a certain number of consistent answer views.Edit 1: Thanks to @Anita Scotch, I got to know that the Quora partner program is now available for other countries too. Copying Anuta’s comment here:If you reside in one of the Countries, The Quora Partner Program is active in, you are eligible to participate in the program.” ( I read more will be added, at some point, but here are the countries, currently eligible at this writing,) U.S., Japan, Germany, Spain, France, United Kingdom, Italy and Australia.11/14/2018Edit 2 : Here is the latest list of countries with 3 new additions eligible for the Quora Partner program:U.S., Japan, Germany, Spain, France, United Kingdom, Italy, Canada, Australia, Indonesia, India and Brazil.Thanks to Monoswita Rez for informing me about this update.
What are harsh realities daycare and preschool providers tend to not tell parents?
My wife and I opened a Drop-In Day care in 2012 and ran it for three years. The real dirty secrets are what YOU do that we know. We know how you treat your kid(s). We know what you say and how you act when you say it. We know this because we see them imitate you with other kids. When a toddler puts his hands on his hips, wags a finger in another kid's face and says "you better straighten up or I'm'onna slap the shit outta you..." Well, we have a pretty good feeling she didn't learn that from My Little Pony.  Another harsh reality is that we can see how you create the exact behavior you don't want: mom comes to pick up, "come on Junior, time to go." Then she starts chatting up the staff. A few minutes later "Junior! Let's go! Ugh! He never listens!" And continues chatting. A few minutes later "Junior.... Time to go." Junior (wisely) ignores mom, since mom has trained him to do that. It's happening right in front of our face right now, mom!For bonus points, mom gets frustrated and goes over to Junior to pick him up and carry him out. Junior runs! What a fun game! Catch me mommy! Haha! (For future reference: No. Stop. Junior come here. No? 'Ok, I'm leaving. Have fun.' Don't stop. Don't turn around. Don't wait. As soon as Junior believes that you really will leave, he will come sprinting.  Now do it consistently, so Junior knows you always mean it).Man, other favorite is the "I'm going to count to one... You better do what I say Johnny....Two... Johnny...come on...Two and a half... Two and three quarters... Two and seven eighths... Johnny don't make me get to three! Two and fifteen sixteenths..." I learned this very important lesson via dog training twenty years ago: if you tell a dog to sit sit sit three times before you make him do it, you teach him that he is supposed to sit when you say it three times. Say it once, then physically demonstrate what you want. For a toddler, that means taking his hand or picking him up or redirecting him after you say it once. Also kids just don't like free play as much as you think. They can do a little, but their little brains can only invent so much fun at once. Then they can't think of anything else to do, they get bored and frustrated. Then you've got trouble. If you move onto the next activity before the current activity stops being fun (15-30 minutes) you have a much, much, much easier time than if you let them "play" until they are unhappy, then try to move them to something new (while they are upset). It sounds harder, but you are lying to yourself. It it not harder than dealing with a tantrum-throwing toddler. It's easy - little Susie is having a great time playing with dolls. "In five minutes, it will be snack time, Susie!" Give them a two minute and one minute reminder and then be really excited that Snack Time has FINALLY ARRIVED! Oh Yeah! Woot Woot! Sna-ack Time!!Ooh I'm on a roll! Another harsh reality: rules don't do a DAY-AMN thing, until they have been tested and enforced. "New rule everybody! No running!" That rule won't actually be in effect until somebody tries running (AND THEY WILL). And gets in trouble for it. "Cause who knows, probably they don't mean it, really." If you make a rule you must defend it in order for it to be a rule. Don't make a rule you can't (or won't) enforce 75 times a day (but seriously, 2 or 3 will do it).The last harsh reality: we can get kids to listen the first time. No really. It would downright make you feel unfit to be a parent. Why? two reasons:As a matter of survival, we can't tolerate any haggling. This will be established within five minutes as your Precious Gift from Heaven want to show right away that she does what she wants, when she wants. We have peer pressure on our side. "Get in a line! Who wants to be the line leader? Everybody?!? Oh my!" To be fair, we struggled with our own kids way more than anyone else's. Those little double agents know your buttons and they know them well. I swear there's extensive toddler double agent recruiting, assessment, and training centers throughout the world. Plan ahead for them to test you, recognize it as a clarification process (not as disrespect towards you) and move on to the laughing and the singing. Oh and we were never happier in our lives than when we closed our daycare and said goodbye to the last whiney, ungrateful, disrespectful parents who had somehow discerned they should just scream at us whenever they didn't understand something. Or walk out without paying. You, know because we were obviously beneath them, being babysitters and all, (never-mind our college degrees from internationally renowned institutions, or our multiple, previous global businesses, or our personal investment of $200,000 to do something good for them and their children).  We had no idea people still got treated this way in America. Especially the people assuming health, safety, and wellbeing of Their Little Everything. We had days that filled us with joy to tears, but mostly we experienced that child care providers are treated like the most worthless people in our society. This is just not right. It's a hard eff'ing job. A room full of toddlers can be like doing calculus in your head in a room full of snapping alligators. Be kind. 
How can I get more people to fill out my survey?
Make it compellingQuickly and clearly make these points:Who you are and why you are doing thisHow long it takesWhats in it for me -- why should someone help you by completing the surveyExample: "Please spend 3 minutes helping me make it easier to learn Mathematics. Answer 8 short questions for my eternal gratitude and (optional) credit on my research findings. Thank you SO MUCH for helping."Make it convenientKeep it shortShow up at the right place and time -- when people have the time and inclination to help. For example, when students are planning their schedules. Reward participationOffer gift cards, eBooks, study tips, or some other incentive for helping.Test and refineTest out different offers and even different question wording and ordering to learn which has the best response rate, then send more invitations to the offer with the highest response rate.Reward referralsIf offering a reward, increase it for referrals. Include a custom invite link that tracks referrals.
My 3 year old doesn't want to go to daycare. How do I find out if it's separation anxiety, or he just doesn't like this daycare?
My mom’s favorite story about my terrible toddler years —-I was 3 years old when she and dad decided I should go to nursery school. The front door was up a half-staircase made of concrete and metal railings (typical outdoor stairway). It was a half-day program. She went up the stairs with me, and when she turned to leave and I realized she was leaving me there, I broke down into a crying fit, sat down on the cold concrete landing, and clung to the railing.They told my mom not to worry, and that I would be okay in a few minutes once she was gone. You have probably figured out by now… she came back 3 hours later and I was still sitting there, clinging to the railing. The solution was that she and my dad took turns for a week, attending preschool with me, and then I was okay.In sharp contrast, I took my son to preschool when he was 3, and, remembering that story, I sat down at a table at the back of the room. About 10 minutes in, he came over and whispered, “Mommy, you can leave now.”One of my teaching internships was with 1st graders and their transition from half day kindergarten to a full school day with no snack time or nap time. Most were just fine, some were a little nervous, and some still had separation anxiety, but were calm after all of the fun stuff we did to get them excited and comfortable in their new classroom.I guess what I am trying to say is that little kids in particular have relatively uncontrollable emotional reactions to certain things. I had to learn to not project my own anxieties onto my son or these kids.You assume it is either separation anxiety or that he just doesn’t like the daycare. In either case, is that a reason for you to stop sending him? Kids overcome the anxiety one way or another, and kids dislike loads of things (they think they dislike lots of things). They learn by actually trying, for more than just a nibble or a few minutes. Do you know any three year old who can clearly articulate why they do or do not like something? Not that they should be able to… a whole lot of adults suck at articulating their feelings.You asked how can you find out as though it should matter. Sorry, but not for this.P.S. In reference to anybody pitting your needs/wants against his…This isn’t about your wants versus his wants. This is about adults needing and wanting to do things to make sure they can pay the bills so their families are fed, clothed, sheltered… and sometimes that means relying on others to care for their children. That DOES supersede what a kid wants. The caveat of course is if you discover you truly do not trust the person or people caring for your kid.
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